Translate Text in Microsoft Office

Everyone knows how to use Google Translate to convert text from one language to another. But many of you did you know there is a translation functionality built in to Microsoft Office?

Microsoft Office 2010 and later editions provide a translation functionality that this can be used to translate selected text or a whole document.

This functionality is only available in the following Microsoft Office programs: Excel, OneNote, Outlook, PowerPoint, Publisher, Visio, and Word. Is an inbuilt feature and there is no requirement for installation of external translation programs or to use translation service from the Internet.

Note: Machine translation is helpful for conveying the basic subject matter of the content and for confirming whether the content is relevant to you. For important or sensitive files, human translation is recommended, because machine translation might not preserve the full meaning and tone of the text.

So let’s get stared:

Translate a whole file

You can have the whole file translated by a computer and displayed in a web browser. When you choose this kind of translation, the content in your file is sent over the internet to a service provider. So:

  • Open the file that you want to translate (I have used the  =rand() command to generate some random text);
  • Click Review in the Ribbon;
  • In the Language group, click Translate;
  • Click Choose Translation Language at the bottom of the pop-up menu;
  • Under Choose document translation languages click the Translate from and Translate to languages that you want and click OK;
  • Click Review, in the Language group and click Translate;
  • Click Translate Document (the From and To languages that you selected should shown into the brackets).

A browser instance opens with your translated text into the language that you selected.

Office_Translation_01

Translate selected text

You can have a word, a phrase, a sentence or even a paragraph translated by a computer and displayed in a web browser. When you choose this kind of translation, the content in your file is sent over the internet to a service provider. So:

  • Open the file with the text that you want to translate;
  • Highlight the text you want to translate;
  • Right click on the highlighted text and select Translate from the pop-up menu (the research pane will open on the right);
  • In the Research pane, in the All Reference Books list, click Translation if is not preselected;
  • Select the Translate from and Translate to languages that you want under Translation section;
  • Click the green right arrow to populate your translation at the bottom if is not already there.

Office_Translation_02

Note: If this is the first time you have used translation services, click OK to install the bilingual dictionaries and enable the translation service through the Research pane. You can also customize which resources are used for translation, click Translation options, and then select the options that you want.

If you want to replace the translated text just click the insert button at the bottom of your translated text (or the copy option from the drop-down menu to paste it where ever is needed)

Rest of the Programs

Microsoft Word was taken to illustrate the above procedures. All the rest of the Microsoft Office programs which have the translation functionality mentioned above can be found as following:

Click Review, in the Language group and then click Translate.

In Microsoft Outlook, you can translate text in an email message that you received in either the message body or in the Reading Pane. You can also use the Translate feature when you create an email message.

Received massages

  • In an email message that you received, select the text in the message body, right click the selected text, and then click Translate on the shortcut menu;

New messages

  • When creating an email message, select the text in the message body, and then click Review, in the Language group and then click Translate.

I hope that this article helped you to understand how to translate text in Microsoft Office. Feel free to share your thoughts about this article using the comments section below or catch us on Twitter.

Nik

Experienced IT Consultant working and living in the UK. In early years he was born and raised up in Greece and been to the UK since studies. He is passionate with technology, gadgets and computers, he really likes the internet and IT in general.

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